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Orchard Owners Monitor Trees Through Frigid Night

By Clip Syndicate
MARIONVILLE, Mo. -- The latest blast of cold weather is making some area farmers nervous, especially after nights like last night, where the temperature dipped down into the 20's.

http://eplayer.clipsyndicate.com/view/12503/6830115 Video: Orchard Owners Monitor Trees Through Frigid Night
MARIONVILLE, Mo. -- The latest blast of cold weather is making some area farmers nervous, especially after nights like last night, where the temperature dipped down into the 20's.
http://chic.clipsyndicate.com/video/playlist/12503/6830115?cpt=8&wpid=2637 Wed, 15 Mar 2017 11:02:30 +0000 Orchard Owners Monitor Trees Through Frigid Night MARIONVILLE, Mo. -- The latest blast of cold weather is making some area farmers nervous, especially after nights like last night, where the temperature dipped down into the 20's. http://chic.clipsyndicate.com/video/playlist/12503/6830115?cpt=8&wpid=2637 KOZL MARIONVILLE, Mo. -- The latest blast of cold weather is making some area farmers nervous, especially after nights like last night, where the temperature dipped down into the 20's. David Murphy, co-owners of Murphy's Orchard in Marionville, has been out all night, monitoring his apple and peach trees. He's been in the farming business for more than three decades. Over the years he's had his fare share of ups and downs. "We've tried everything we can do. Sometimes one degree makes a lot of difference in the crop," Murphy says. "We've been able to raise the temperature 3 to 4 degrees here by burning hay bales and using a propane heater." Some buds have already been killed off by below-freezing temperatures this week. Murphy says that will impact next year's crop. "We've not given up on them yet. We'll know tomorrow," Murphy says. "But (next year) they'll be thicker on the trees because they'll put all the energy into making buds instead of fruit and buds." "What concerns me, it got colder than they thought it would. I think it probably got down to 18, 19, I have one thermometer that said 15. We've been able to hold it to 23 here, so we don't know exactly how much damage we're going to have." Murphy says he'll be able to assess his crop loss later today. Because of the late freeze, any surviving peaches may be available in early June.




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