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Morning Sports Report - August 22, 2017

By Clip Syndicate
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Health and wellness is a crucial aspect of playing in the NFL, and knowing when to come off the field can save players some pain. Now, a Kansas City Chiefs player may soon be able to diagnose himself.

http://eplayer.clipsyndicate.com/view/12449/7054781 Video: Morning Sports Report - August 22, 2017
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Health and wellness is a crucial aspect of playing in the NFL, and knowing when to come off the field can save players some pain. Now, a Kansas City Chiefs player may soon be able to diagnose himself.
http://chic.clipsyndicate.com/video/playlist/12449/7054781?cpt=8&wpid=2637 Tue, 22 Aug 2017 09:21:00 +0000 Morning Sports Report - August 22, 2017 KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Health and wellness is a crucial aspect of playing in the NFL, and knowing when to come off the field can save players some pain. Now, a Kansas City Chiefs player may soon be able to diagnose himself. http://chic.clipsyndicate.com/video/playlist/12449/7054781?cpt=8&wpid=2637 KOLR Morning Sports Report - August 22, 2017 Chiefs' OL in Training to be a Physician KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Health and wellness is a crucial aspect of playing in the NFL, and knowing when to come off the field can save players some pain. Now, a Kansas City Chiefs player may soon be able to diagnose himself. The Kansas City Chiefs will play their third pre season game of year this Friday at Seattle. And as KOLR10's Dan Lucy reports, one Chiefs lineman may-be a master on the field, but is a soon-to-be doctor off the field. Tucked in the middle of the Chiefs offensive line, is Kansas City's renaissance man. His name is Laurent Duvernay-Tardif, or you can call him Larry. Next summer you can also call him Doctor, as in physician. "You have to change your mindset pretty quickly. I was doing anesthesia this summer, so working in the OR, getting up early, and working with patients that are vulnerable," Duvernay-Tardif says. "It was a tremendous experience, but like you said you have to flip the switch and when you come here and you step on the field you have to be ready to make some blocks and be physical out there." Larry is about to do what few mere mortals have been able to accomplish, complete medical school while playing professional football. The Montreal native has been going through residency and taking medical school exams during the Chiefs off seaons and bye weeks. "It's not about money. I think it's about passion. I love what I do off the field. I think for me medicine is my way to stay grounded when I go back. As a medical student in the winter you start at the bottom of the food chain, it keeps you grounded." He'll graduate from medical school in May. He'd love to win a Super Bowl championship a few months before that. And it starts with long hot practices in camp. "I think for me it's about consistency," Duvernay-Tardif notes. "When you get paid a lot as an O-Lineman you're not getting paid to make even better blocks, I think you're getting paid to be more consistent. That's what I need to work on and that's where my focus is this year." Laurent Duvernay-Tardif's background reads like an adventure novel. His family owned a vineyard and a bakery in Montreal. And as a kid he and his family explored the east coast of the United States in a sail boat. The 6' 5" 321 pound right guard didn't even speak fluent English until he was in med school. "It's pretty neat. There's not a lot of guys that can do that," says Matt Nagy, Chiefs' offensive coordinator. "For him to have two really important things in his life and be good at both of them is pretty neat." The health of NFL players has been a hot topic the last year of so. And with his medical background, Larry has his opinions on the game he loves, and the hippocratic oath he's about to take. "I keep an eye on that. At the end of the day, it's about being educated about the symptoms and pulling yourself out of the play and everybody around you respecting the symptoms. Having a headache is just as important as when you have a knee injury and when you respect that and there's that change of culture that's where things are going to move on."





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